Positive Program for Performance Appraisal

By: Alva F. Kindall and James Gatza I Publisher: Harvard Business Review I Published: 1963 I Resource Added: 2013

In this article for managers, the authors contend that traditional performance appraisal programs fail in part, because they are focused on subjective assessments of an employee’s personality, rather than the results themselves. Instead, a performance management program should focus on improvement of an employee’s performance in the current job and development of the employee’s skills for higher positions in the future. The article argues that an effective performance management system is based in communication between manager and employee, and involves the following steps: establishing the job content and performance targets, discussing the plan, determining checkpoints, and checking results. This system demystifies performance management and ensures that the employee knows what results will be assessed, strengthens the partnership between the manager and employee and allows them to jointly determine goals, and helps the employee develop professionally.